Kne-Mida (In Scale) – IPMS Israel Magazine No. 47, 12/2007

Modeling a “David” vehicle in the IDF service – by Benny Geezer

The “David” vehicle is heavily reinforced Landrover’s Defender 110 vehicle.
The modification had been performed by MDT (a subsidiary of Arotech), at the city of Lod, Israel.
The introduction into service began in 2006, as the “David” began replacing all existing “Sufa” vehicles.
Destined for urban warfare, it combines 360° protection with additional engine power and maneuverability.
It had two major variants:

  1. Command and control vehicle
  2. Troop carrying vehicle.

The article focuses on the command and control vehicle, with many external and internal photos

References:

  1. www.arotech.com/index.html
  2. www.mdt-armor.com
  3. www.mdtisrael.com          

p.4-7

Modeling a Space Ship diorama – by Eyal Reinfeld                                                          

Eyal chose to model the “Full Thrust” space battle games, made by www.groundzerogames.net.
For that purpose, he had ordered a battle cruiser, a frigate and six combat vehicles.

For the diorama concept design, Eyal used the PowerPoint software.
After printing the relevant side views, Eyal used Evergreen plasticards to create the designed structures.
Spare parts were used to create the antenna poles
Plasticard tubes were used to carry the space crafts due to its added weight.

For painting, Eyal used Vallejo colors of the Model Color line.

The full article appears at www.degem.net    

 

p.8-10

Nord 2501 Noratlas in IAF Service – by Ilan Warshai and Noam Hartoch                    

By the early 1950s, the need for a new tactical transport aircraft became imminent within IAF commanders.
Between 1950 and 1955, a small quantity of C-47 had been purchased to augment the existing fleet.
By 1954, a civilian Noratlas, NC856, had been brought to Israel for demonstration, within the IAF light squadron, but it had been overruled and returned to France.
IAF personnel were highly impressed with its ability to carry seven tons of cargo (with respect to only three by the C-47), the ability to remove the rear shell doors, for carriage of irregular payloads, such as a Jeep or a Command Car.
Troop and Cargo para dropping qualities, were also superior to the existing C-47.
However, the MOD had been less enthusiastic, due to its higher price with respect to the American C-82 and C-119 airplanes.

Eventually, due to the special ties between the Israeli and French governments, six Nords had been purchased, in two batches of three airplanes, with the first three having arrived to Israel during the winter of 1956.
The first three models had been registered as FAP, FAQ and FAR, as part of the civilian registration FAA/Z of the C-47 fleet.
The two models had served within the same squadron.
The other three, FAS, FAR and FAU has been delivered during February-April 1959.
As part of West Germany’s policy of supporting the state of Israel, a huge arms sales program had been signed between the two countries.
As part of it, 18 Noratlas airplanes had been delivered to the IAF.
As a highly secretive deal, the German airplanes had been flown directly from operational Luftwaffe squadrons to Lahr airbase, which had been a French controlled airbase within Germany.
Upon arrival to the base, all existing German markings had been sprayed on by Israel civilian call signs, and during the early morning hours, in complete darkness, the airplanes had taken off to Israel, flown by Israeli crews.
The first six German airplanes had arrived to Israel by June 1960, comprising FAN, FAO, FAV, FAW, FAX and FAY.
Six additional airplanes, FAA – FAF, had arrived by December 1962, while the last six, FAG – FAL, had been delivered by November-December 1963.

Exceptionally, all German airplane had only been marked with its civilian call signs, while its French counterparts, had carried additional tail numbers, for a very short period.
The Noratlas has been operated by IAF’s “Elephants” squadron, which by 1956-1957 had mainly operated the C-47 and additional reserve B-17 and Catalina components.
During operation “Kadesh”, the IAF had only two serviceable Noratlases.

One of which, probably FAQ, had been repainted in EL-AL livery, with a fictive ALH civil call sign.
This airplane had clandestinely operated many arms transport missions from France to Israel, before and during the operation.

In the years after the “Kadesh” operation, the three airplanes conducted many training missions, specifically dropping of equipment and paratroopers.
It also took part in many overseas missions, mostly to European destinations.
From Europe, military equipment had been transported to Israel, while the Noratlases also took part in each of the ferrying missions of the Super Mystere, Vautour, Fuga Magister, Ouragan and Mirage, serving as liaison and logistic support platforms.
During the 1960s, due to the flourishing diplomatic relations between the state of Israel and many African states, the Noratlases had performed many demonstration flights in Ethiopia, Zaire, Uganda, Eritrea and Tanzania.

The increase in quantity also allowed for in house large demonstrations, when a formation of 19 Noratlases took part in the 1964 Independence Day flyby, while 16 airplanes flew a very accurate diamond combination during the 1966 Independence Day flyby.

A single fatal accident had occurred in the night of 29-30 April 1964.
Noratlas FAD had been conducting a night training mission with cadets from the flying school’s navigation branch.
While conducting a low level run, sue to a human error, the airplane had hit the ground and all nine onboard had been killed.

Some of the Noratlases were also used as SIGINT platforms, and also occasionally carried out Oblique Photography missions, having carried the special camera, facing the Para dropping doors, which had been removed from the airplane for that purpose.

By the end of May 1967, the squadron comprised of 23 serviceable Noratlases.
Some aircrafts had been dispersed to other locations, in preparation to the coming hostilities.
When the Six Days war began, Jordanian Hunters had attacked the Kfar Sirkin airfield, destroying Noratlas FAX and a Piper Super Cub.
During the war, the Noratlases performed communication liaison, equipment, fuel and troop transportation and aerial maritime patrols.

By 1968, the Suez Canal front line had seen extensive fighting between the IDF and the Egyptian army.
The IDF began initiating deep strikes inside the Egyptian homeland.
The Noratlases had been used to drop large size bombs on several bridges over the river Nile.

During the Yom Kippur war, the Noratlases flew many supply missions, transportation of reserve personnel and airlifting wounded soldiers to hospitals in Israel.
During that period, the squadron has operated 19 Noratlases.

By August 1974, the squadron had transitioned from Tel-Nof airbase, to Lod airbase in preparation to its conversion into a C-130 squadron.
By April 1978, the last serviceable Noratlas had been flown to the IAF museum.

In the beginning of 1977, a single Noratlas, FAG (tail number 055) had been transferred to IAI.
It had received the civil registration AOS.
It had served for various development tasks, and mainly was engaged in transporting Mirage fuselage sections from France to Israel.
It had also transported the two-seat cockpit section of the Kfir, which had been manufactured by Dassault, for IAI.
By March 1983, it had been flown to the IAF museum.

The French Noratlases had been of the N2501IS subtype, while the German Noratlases were of the N2501D subtype.
Externally, almost identical, the German D Noratlases had a pair of upper pitot tubes, behind the cockpit, while the French Noratlases had the tube at the forward tip of the fuselage.

All Noratlases entered IAF service in the natural metal position.
By October 1956, FAR had been painted in the Blue/Brown pattern.
However, for overseas missions, at least 8 Noratlases had retained its natural metal, with a gloss white upper surfaces.
After the Six Days war most of the Noratlases had been painted by the standard three tone camouflage pattern.
By the end of 1973, all tail numbers had been painted white, on both sides of the forward section, with the addition of the prefix 0.

Enclosed, a table of all IAF Noratlases:

Civil
call sign

Type

Introduction into service

Notes

FAA

N2501D

Dec. 1962

At the city of Kiryat Malachi

FAB

N2501D

Dec. 1962

 

FAC

N2501D

Dec. 1962

At the IAF museum

FAD

N2501D

Dec. 1962

Crashed on the night of April 29th, 1964, killing all nine on board

FAE

N2501D

Dec. 1962

At the IAF museum

FAF

N2501D

Dec. 1962

Gate guard at the Lod air base

FAG

N2501D

Dec. 1963

Operated by IAI under AOS registration. At the IAF museum

FAH

N2501D

Dec. 1963

At the IAF technical school in Haifa

FAI

N2501D

Dec. 1963

 

FAJ

N2501D

Dec. 1963

 

FAK

N2501D

Dec. 1963

 

FAL

N2501D

Dec. 1963

Destroyed in a fire drill at Lod airport

FAN

N2501D

June 1960

At a yard in Bnei-Barak

FAO

N2501D

June 1960

 

FAP

N2501IS

Jan. 1956

 

FAQ

N2501IS

Winter 1956

 

FAR

N2501IS

Winter 1956

 

FAS

N2501IS

Feb. 1959

Sold for scrapes

FAT

N2501IS

March 1959

Sold for scrapes

FAU

N2501IS

April 1959

 

FAV

N2501D

June 1960

Destroyed in a fire drill at Lod airport

FAW

N2501D

June 1960

At the Nachshon forest

FAX

N2501D

June 1960

Destroyed by Jordanians Hunters on June 5th, 1967

FAY

N2501D

June 1960

 

 

By 1964, Heller had issued a 1:170th scale kit of the Noratlas, which had been reissued by 1995.
In the 1:72nd scale there exists another Heller kit, which can fully represent the D and IS models in IAF service.
As for decaling, most appear in the kit’s decal sheet, while quadroon emblems can be obtained from ISRADECAL sheets.
As for the civil registrations, the modeler will have to improvise.

 

p.12-31

Modeling a “Netz” of the “Flying Dragon” squadron – by Amit Ya’ari                          

Amit modeled “Netz” 264 of the “Flying Dragon” squadron, from the old Hasegawa V-1 F-16A PLUS 1:48th scale kit.
Amit also used Isracast Netz conversion kit plus Isradecal IAF47 decal sheet.
The ejection seat had been replaced by an Aires resin one, plus the addition of seat rails made by Evergreen pieces.
Amit also scratch built the additional sway brace of the centerline pylon in order to give it an actual look. The additional pieces were taken from a Hasegawa F-15 kit.
A full article appears in www.degem.net

 

p.32-34

Straight from the box                                                                                                

The article surveys the following new decal sheets:

    1. Isradecal IAF-58 and IAF-59 for Israeli F-4 and Kurnass 2000, in 1:48th scale.
    2. Isradecal IAF-60 for Israeli A-4 and Improved Ayit, in 1:48th scale.
    3. Isradecal IAF-61 for Israeli AF roundels in various scales.

Conversion kit:

  1. PJ Productions (from Belgium) ATAR 9C exhaust pipe for the Mirage IIIC, in 1:72nd and 1:48th scales.

Can be obtained directly of through Hannants.

             

p.35

Modeling a Monogram B-17 in 1:48th scale, part 2 – by Daniel Shoch                            

In this article, Daniel details the various machine gun installations.
Daniel chose to use the existing kit machine guns as the base for the assembly, while only replacing the barrels of each gun with a subsequent barrel from Verlinden’s kit.

As for the various windows, Daniel chose to use the existing kit parts, save for the Cheyenne rear post, for which Daniel used the Squadron’s glass pieces.

For decaling, Daniel used Aeromaster’s decals, by using Future for proper sealing.

Daniel used the following references:

  1. Squadron/Signal publications no-63: B-17 in action.
  2. Birdsall S.,: Fighting Colors B-17 Flying Fortress.
  3. Ethell J., L., ET AL: The Great Book of WW II Airplanes, Bonanza books.
  4. Verlinden Lock ON #24: Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress.

 


p.36-39

Modeling an Anti-Terrorist Diorama in 1:35th scale – by Ariel Debesh                         

Ariel chose to model a scene of a house break-in, done by two men anti terrorist team.
One member, equipped with a shot gun, will be by the side door, while the other is prepared to clear the room with a hand grenade.

Ariel used several kits of Modern Military Figures, Tamiya and 101ST Airborne of Trumpetere.
Relevant body sections were cut and glued, in order to create the desired body shapes and equipment.

As for the weapons, both soldiers carry the M4 advanced version of the M-16, made from the short M-16 of the LRRP kit.

Basic uniforms were painted in a mix of 60% Humbrol 105, 40% Humbrol 66, plus a few drops of yellow and brown.

            

p.40-41

Book Review                                                                                                                     

The article reviews the following books:

  1. Tayeset 119, by Shlomo Aloni
  2. Israeli AF Yearbook, by Ofer Zidon and Shlomo Aloni.
  3. Tayeset 101, by Shlomo Aloni and Ra’anan Weiss
  4. The Kfir in IAF Service, by ISRADECAL

 

p.42

BACK